Tag Archives: Run

Race Recap: Ironman Austin 70.3

Austin got added to my schedule late in the game; actually, after I thought my season was already over to be precise. After Whistler I felt strong physically and wasn’t satisfied ending the season on a mediocre (at best) note. I thought about IM Cozumel (THANK GOD I DIDN’T DECIDE TO DO ANOTHER FULL IM) for a few moments, but worried about having another sub par race and decided the cost – both financial and potentially emotional and physical – wasn’t worth it.

Austin was a great compromise for me. I got to extend the season by a couple of months to take advantage of the end of the mild sunny NW season, travel with some great training buddies, see a new place (Austin!), and fingers crossed close the season out feeling positive and ready for rest.

Our pre-race trip was a blast. We drove the course, checked out the lake, SBR-ed a little, laughed a LOT, and generally kept things low-key. Our rental property had tons of chickens and ducks (for eggs), and produce grows there year round to provide for 20 families that are part of the co-op. We took full advantage of the eggs and produce and had a legendary and awesome pre-race meal chef-ed up by G. And then it was race day.

(race recap vid by G – way better than photos!)

Pre-Race

I woke up 10 minutes before my alarm was set to go off race morning to a HUGE clap of thunder and lightning and sheets of water falling from the sky. Really? Ugh. I reminded myself if anyone could combat water falling from the sky it was us NW ladies and I simply ignored the fact that this day could get ugly.

Our chauffeurs (our men) drove us to the finish line, where we had to catch a shuttle to the swim/T1. Thanks (but not!) to the weather, traffic was backed up for miles, and though we’d left 3 hours to take a 35-minute drive (including the shuttle) and set up transition we only ended up with a few spare minutes to get our tires pumped and evacuate T1.

Swim // 34:47 // 1:48/100 m

I was really nervous about this swim. I always am nervous about every swim. But because of cooler temps and dwindling morning light I hadn’t gotten a solid distance OWS in over 3 weeks.

All that for nothing though, because it was pretty decent. I started out less aggressively than I probably should have, but was only 2 rows back and 5 swimmers right of the main line. The first 400 went from calm (such polite swimmers in Texas!) to a shit show, to calm again, and then I knew I’d be fine. All was smooth and well until the last stretch back in to shore, at which point our very late starting wave (3rd to last or so?) started hitting all of the floaters from earlier waves. Floaters being the people from earlier waves who were stopped to take a break, tread water, and hang on to kayaks. It got rough on the way back trying to manage them, the super speedy swimmers who were passing from the wave after us, and increasingly choppy water.

I continued to work hard and swim up to where my hand touched the ground. As I exited the lake I had no clue what my swim time was and just ran up the chute to the strippers and on to T1. In retrospect:

-I liked the swim course. The buoys were really easy to spot.  The triangle was pretty even and no turns were overly sharp. The water was murky but didn’t feel dirty or dark.

-I should have gone out harder from the start. I never got that OH SHIT I CANT BREATHE panic feeling which means I didn’t swim hard enough. But, I did enjoy having a smooth swim and not having the though of quitting cross my mind. (Yes, during every single swim I think about quitting at least once.) It felt good to be strong for the whole swim and to never fade.

-I know someone has to go last (or near it) but I’ve never encountered so many floundering swimmers. Not even in Boise! It was frustrating knowing that I could have gone faster without having quite a few small delays in getting around people.

T1 // 2:59

The transition area was much larger than I’d anticipated but luckily I knew where my bike was. Unluckily the recent rains had caused Goat Heads to grow everywhere. For those unfamiliar, these prickly bristly little vines are so sharp they rip tires and flat tubes so we were advised to carry out bikes the entire way out of transition. (Yeah yeah, if only I raced Cyclocross I’d be proficient at that).

My transition itself – meaning wetsuit off, run to bike, bike stuff on, wetsuit in bag – was very efficient, but I lost some time trying to carry my bike for sure. And I felt like an idiot. When I got to the mount line I realized I had a Goat Head in my shoe. I ripped my shoe off to get it out and hoped that was the only one.

Bike // 2:43:15 // 20.58 mph

At mile 2 I pulled up on my pedal to climb a tiny incline and my foot went FLYING. My stomach dropped as I thought I was going down, but I regained my balance and pulled over to a dead stop. Mud from the heavy morning rain was stuck in my cleats from running through T1. I did my best to dig it out with my fingernails and though frustrated I felt grateful that I hadn’t flatted like SO SO SO many people I’d already passed. A significant portion of athletes didn’t even make it to mile 2 without flatting from the Goat Heads.

The next 45?ish miles of the bike were frustrating. The pro: I felt like a pro! I was passing EVERYONE (which is what happens when hardly anyone starts later than you, regardless of how fast you actually are). The con: There were people all over the road and in some spots it was really tough to get around them. Like areas that weren’t closed to vehicle traffic or where pavement was poor (which was most of the course).

That said I enjoyed the bike more than I thought I would. The course wasn’t Texas-pretty like I’d expected, and wasn’t as flat as I had in mind either, but it was a new experience to ride hard for the whole leg, knowing that there weren’t climbs to save up for. I have never hit a goal HR for a 70.3 (always a bit low) but in Austin I exceeded it by a few bpm’s and felt strong. I KNEW I wouldn’t blow up.

T2 // 2:58

I was pretty excited to be off the bike by the end and climbed into T2 ready to run. I got a little bit disoriented finding my rack, which is no one’s fault but my own. I had practiced identifying the spot but I guess in the moment I just forgot. I probably lost 30 seconds or so; after making one mistake I slowed down a little to make sure I didn’t make another.

Run // 1:43:14 // 7:54 min/mi

The run was a 3-loop course that in a sick way I sort of looked forward to. A bit boring? Yes. But who is looking at scenery during a 70.3 run? If you are HTFU. A 3-loop course made it easy to break down: Loop 1 – adjust, Loop 2 – hold steady, Loop 3 – push to the end.

As always, the run is a bit of a blur to me. It was great to see my teammates and friends out on the course and I cheered loud every time I saw them. I felt tired the whole time, but solid. The run was quite hilly with hardly a flat section, some trail, and some mud, all quite evident from my huge range in splits from mile to mile. I know I didn’t take in nearly enough calories on the run, which perhaps contributed to my fog.  But my body felt on the borderline of rejection so I stuck to coke and other liquids at every aid station and that got me through.

I’m proud of my run not only because I PR’d it on a not easy course, but because I pushed so hard all day leading up and still stayed strong. There was a walk-worthy hill out there (that we hit 3 times, obvs) but I didn’t… I ran. I told myself all morning that THIS.WAS.IT. and that I should be grateful for being out there. And I gave it my all and really did feel grateful all day long, for a good race, a supportive husband, good friends, and a fun trip.

Overall 5:07:10 // 15th AG

In the end I PR’d by 8:45, after already knocking nearly 9 minutes off my PR on the distance earlier in July. I am thrilled. This was such a better end to the season than fading off post-Whistler and starting a 4-month off-season feeling less than stellar.

Would I recommend Austin 70.3 to others? Yes. I’ve heard mixed reviews from others, but I really enjoyed the race and the course. The more I race this distance the more I realize there is no perfect race; every course leaves more to be desired, the weather is always a factor, and you never know when your wave will start. Austin was a much flatter bike than you’d get anywhere around the NW, but I was pleasantly surprised by the rollers to keep things interesting. The run was tough – but aren’t they all?

Now… To the off-season! (Which I’m already winning at, by the way.)

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Tucker

Meet my newest training buddy.

Tucker!

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He’s a baby, just 6 months, so he won’t be ready to run distance for a bit. But I’m pretty sure he’s gonna be a runner!

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Race Recap: Ironman Canada – The Run & Post-Race

THE RUN – 4:16:33 // 9:47min/mi average

As I ran out of T2 I saw my friends and family again, and all I could think about was whether they knew I’d had struggles on the bike. I mean, I don’t know how they would know because I certainly didn’t take time to stop and tell them! But I’d told them that I expected to come in under 6 hours with 100% certainty, and I didn’t. I worried about them worrying about me.

Running out of transition

Running out of transition

The run course is a double loop with an extra tail at the end. The loop being about 12.5 miles (each time). The first 4ish miles are on packed gravel trail has a few long gradual climbs and a few short steeper ones. It’s not extremely technical, but it does wind back and forth and up and down with more intensity than a wide and paved road would.

The gravel trail ends near Green Lake where you run along the boardwalk and then onto a paved trail for a mile or so. Next is long out and back along the highway (which was still closed to traffic) for a couple of miles. The road is slightly off camber and there are a couple long rolling ups and downs, but the view of Green Lake is worth it! After running back there’s more paved trail that winds through the trees (shade!), alongside the stream, beside a few housing developments, and right past the finish line for round 2.

Ironman Canada Whistler Run Course

The run is kind of a blur to me – all I know is that I let myself off the hook very early, and I regret it very much. I don’t think I made it 2 miles before I convinced myself that my stomach hurt and stopped for my FIRST EVER mid-race porta potty trip. The real problem was that I felt sorry for myself, so rather than try to run through it I let myself off the hook.

Shortly after this photo I turned down a high 5 from a friend "because my hands are bloody". Wonder what spectators thought about me shouting that mid-race!

Shortly after this photo I turned down a high 5 from a friend “because my hands are bloody”. Wonder what spectators thought about me shouting that mid-race!

For the entire first loop I took periodic walk breaks – they may have started as “walking through the aid station” but each one lasted longer and longer and longer. I tried to stop a couple of times to get paper towel for my nose, which was still bleeding, but some of the aid stations wanted me to stop and sit down. If they weren’t willing to give me a paper towel for the road I was off!

I hated everything. I felt disappointed in my day and angry at myself for having given in, but I couldn’t muster a real rally. I didn’t see any point in trying to kill myself now to post a time I wouldn’t be thrilled about anyway (#badchoices).

Ironman Canada Run

A brief moment when I was actually running with enough speed to have both feet off the ground

I started thinking about how much fun I usually have doing this sport; even when I hate it I’m having the time of my life! But in these moments I wasn’t. So I decided if I couldn’t have the race I had trained for and wanted, it was okay to make it more fun. I committed to getting to where I knew I’d see my friends, family, and coach next, but at that point if I still hated everything I would allow myself to stop and tell them and figure out how to proceed.

The funny thing is, as soon as I saw them I didn’t hate anything anymore (other than my bloody nose and tired legs). I waved and ran by and that was the end of feeling sorry for myself.

Soon to be starting loop 2, head down, tissue in hand!

Soon to be starting loop 2, head down, tissue in hand!

The second loop wasn’t much better pace-wise, but I could finally smile about being out there. I became grateful to be there again, and it didn’t hurt that I picked off a couple of girls in my AG in the final 6 miles.

2 seconds off from last year's time. Unbelievable!

2 seconds off from last year’s time. Unbelievable!

I ran down the finish chute and laughed out loud as I saw the clock ticking. I could speed up and beat my time from last year – or I could have an epic story about finishing 2 separate and completely different Ironmans with the exact same number on the clock. Shockingly I did have some (small amount of) pride left so I kicked for the last bit and came in at 11:35:55, 2 seconds faster than last year. But this year I did hear the announcer proclaim me an Ironman.

OVERALL – 11:35:55 // 11th AG

Obligatory step and repeat photos

Obligatory step and repeat photos

Post Race

The hours and days after the race were good. After I got out of medical for my bloody nose my people retrieved my stuff while I limped to the shower. We had good food and good wine that night, and celebrated the day, the year, and being together. I got to enjoy Whistler without worry or guilt, including champagne, oysters, and an amazing dinner that completely took my mind off of Ironman.

Amazing view from Peak 2 Peak

Amazing view from Peak 2 Peak

And since then, in recounting my race to others and putting on a smile for their sake, I’ve convinced myself that I’m okay with the day. Truly, I’m content with it.

You see, there’s really no other option. IYes, I’m disappointed, but the only thing I did wrong was have a bad attitude, and I’ve forgiven myself for that. Life’s too short.

Next time (or the next 100 times) I want to give up or give in Ironman #2 will come flooding back to me, and then I’ll keep going.

Yep. Whistler Re-do 2014!

Yep. Whistler Re-do 2014!

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Race Recap: Winter Half Marathons

I realized that I never recapped the Lake Samammish Half Marathon on March 9, or the Tacoma City Half Marathon on May 5th, so for record keeping purposes here’s the gist.

In all honestly running hasn’t felt very good to me since winter 2012, when I was on a half marathon PR roll. Training for my third 13.1 in so many months I got another stress fracture and had to take time off of my feet (which was replaced by the bike and swim).  Once I returned to running amidst IM training things just never really felt the same. Running was a struggle, my heart rate was high, and I couldn’t ever get back into the groove and rhythm of it.  Running was a fight and I fought hard, but running off the bike is very different than “just” running, so I went with it.

Leading up the NYCM I felt the same slow, heavy, and sluggish feeling: running was difficult! I continued to fight it and I’m sure I would have finished that race with a PR of a few minutes or so, but at that point neither my heart nor body was really in it. And that race was cancelled.

This winter I took a step back and really worked on building my base back up. All of my runs were very low heart rate (on purpose) with a slow and easy pace to try to build back up some of the endurance I’d wrecked fighting my training all fall.

Lake Sammamish Half Marathon – 1:37:38

Megan, Meghan, and me at the start of the Lake Sammamish Half Marathon. Photo courtesy of http://meghanswanderings.blogspot.com/.

Megan, Meghan, and me at the start of the Lake Sammamish Half Marathon. Photo courtesy of http://meghanswanderings.blogspot.com/

During the Lake Sammamish Half Marathon it worked. I finished in 1:37:38 on only 3 easy slow runs per week. Back when I hit my 1:35:XX times I was busting my butt running at least 4-5 times per week with tough effort! I was surprised at and happy with my performance at the LSHM. Though it wasn’t a PR, for the type of training I’d been doing it was a good result.

Tacoma City Half Marathon – 1:42:15

The Tacoma City Half Marathon was not as successful; I finished in 1:42:15. Did I go out too fast? Yes. Was it the first hot and sunny day of the year? Yes. Did I have allergies? Yes. But those are all lame excuses. I set out with a heart rate target and though I kept that part right on track my pace was almost 45s/mile slower than it “should have” been. The “should have” being based off of data taken from training.

 

So that’s the story. Would I run both of them again? Yes. I really enjoyed the LSHM for the small size, easy start, and flat course. I also really enjoyed the TCHM course and the fact that it was a small race, however it was definitely hillier than I expected and I don’t have strong feelings toward it simply because I didn’t have a great day.

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boston with love

This morning I ran to Seward Park and planned to loop the 2.5 mile path a few times to ensure controlled terrain for interval work amidst a 2 hour long run.

I always run the park clockwise. I’m not sure why – I literally have never run it counterclockwise – because it never fails that the majority of traffic is head on. But when I have the kind of workout that lends itself to running a loop over and over and over again that traffic is almost helpful. Seeing other people’s faces helps to remind me to focus on what I’m doing; my brain feels as though they are watching me approach and so I don’t let up.

I tried to make sure I gave every runner a smile and nod today in light of what happened in Boston, and I definitely got more than my fair share back. One older man even sat on a bench cheering every runner that went by, arms waving in the air complete with hollering. He looked as happy as I was to receive cheers every time I gave him the thumbs up and thanked him.

On the start of my third loop a man who I’d now seen three times waved and nodded (for the third time) and as I passed he joked, “How many times are you gonna run around here?” I smiled and facetiously told him this was it for today, and that then I’d be out of his way.

As I finished my final loop, now almost out of the park, I saw him for the fourth time. He was headed back in. As he approached he removed his headphones and told me he was gearing up for one more, and that I had inspired this final lap.

I wish I’d seen him again to tell him that he – along with the cheering man – inspired my miles home.

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Running is a solitary sport. Except that it isn’t at all.

Moments like this are why I started this blog in the first place, moments that make you fall in love with how sport brings us together and what it teaches us, all over again.

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Ironman Canada Photos

Thanks to Colin & Alanna for these amazing pictures. Far better than anything Brightroom has ever captured!

Please ignore my highly advanced fuel storage system.

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Injury Fake Out

Coming down from Ironman has been a humbling experience. I feel eager and excited and full of energy…until I’m 3 miles into a 6 mile run and want to just take a nap. My muscles aren’t burning, my joints aren’t creaky, but I’ve been insanely sleepy. In fact, I could pretty much – 3+ weeks later – fall asleep at any moment. The sleepiness is starting to lift though and with each workout my body is waking up more quickly and engaging more efficiently. I finally feel like the fog is lifting.

Which is why it was especially infuriating after Track Tuesday one week ago that my right foot started hurting. My right foot being the one that’s been fine since Portland Marathon 2009. During the 2 mile time trial my foot felt fine – the rest of my body including my lungs is a whole other story – but when I got in the car and started driving home my big toe felt cramped in a claw-like position, and the cramp extended into my arch. Having battled PF before I knew what to do and iced, rolled it out, and stretched my toes.

So when it hurt 100x more the next day I was really angry. And concerned. Wednesday morning my big toe joint was immensely swollen, and the pain was radiating from the center of the joint upward. I could hardly walk on the poor toe, because I really couldn’t move it. As the day progressed it hurt more and more, and then I got worried. I called my doctor in a panic and though he was leaving on vacation the next day he let me come in after hours to take a look.

When I arrived and described the pain he looked grim. And when he came back with x-rays I knew that he had not good news to share. He showed me a few x-rays that looked fine, and then we got to looking as my sesamoids. The words ” stress fracture” and “boot” were said. According to the x-ray my 2 sesamoid bones were in 3 pieces.

What 2 sesamoid bones should look like. (But not actually my x-ray)

I left the office feeling like my heart had been ripped out and thrown on the floor. 4-6 weeks in a boot. No NWM Half. No NYC Marathon. But it wasn’t even the boot-time and missed races that got to me the most. What got to me is that this time, this training cycle, I listened to my body. Since my last bout with stress fractures at the slightest sign of something amiss I’ve taken action, be it rest or physical therapy this time around. On the list of top 200 body parts that hurt during training or racing IMC this spot on my body wasn’t ever on the radar, truly. I drove home wondering how I’d ever be able to trust my own instinct again, and arrived on the assumption that I wouldn’t.

In the following hours I became more and more doubtful – 50% in myself and ability to read pain, but 50% in my doctor. Sure I’d wear a boot, but only until I could get a 2nd opinion on the injury. Generally stress fractures can’t be seen in x-rays, and if I was going to be in a boot for 6 weeks I wanted concrete proof that I needed to be there. My doctor was gone so I couldn’t show up on his office doorstep anymore, so I pulled together a list of new doctors to call first thing in the morning. At 8am I called and pled my case with each office. Thank you sports medicine community for listening to my woes – I was granted appointments with every doctor that I called and had my pick. I picked Dr. Blahous at The Sports Medicine Clinic.

I arrived, explained the onset and pain, and the doctor was great. He didn’t discount my previous diagnosis too much, but at the same time said that it didn’t sound like a fracture of any kind to him. Music to my ears!! He poked and prodded and asked thoughtful questions, then more x-rays. This time around they took images of both feet and I thought nothing of it.

Dr. Blahaus came back and shared new images with me. This time the image was more clear; the blurry line that had looked like a fracture the day before was much more pronounced, and my sesamoid bones were much more separated.

Again, not my x-ray. But this is what my x-ray looked like. I have a Bipartate Sesmoid.

Then my new favorite person in the world then shared the news that earned them that title: No fracture, I’m just a freak!

“Sesamoid fractures need to be differentiated from bipartite, or two part sesamoids.  Bipartite sesamoids are found in less than 10% of the general population.  Bipartite sesamoids are usually found bilaterally.  Therefore, one way to differentiate a bipartite sesamoid from a fractured sesamoid is to take a comparison x-ray of the non-symptomatic foot.  Bipartite sesamoids usually have a rounded appearance at the separation of the two fragments while fractures are typically sharp edged, without rounded edges.”

Though the physical pain and swelling didn’t immediately disappear with this news, I felt like a boulder had been lifted off my emotional and psychological state. The doctor guessed that the pain was some sort of soft tissue issue, prescribed lots of ice and Advil, and guessed I’d be good as new in a couple of days. His thought that track work on a tired body was the culprit.

The moral of this story: Trust yourself. 4 days later I’m back to running with no swelling, minimal tenderness, and no real pain. I can’t stop thinking about if I had agreed to hang in a boot for 6 weeks…for no reason!

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Tri Anniversary #1

This weekend is the one-year anniversary of my relationship with triathlon.

That’s some crazy right there.

I was still limping from Boston. Memorial Day 2011 I bought my first bike. Later that week I registered for TriRock Seattle, an Olympic distance triathlon on July 16. Then I pieced together my own training plan with Hal Higdon’s intermediate half marathon plan and an intermediate Olympic distance triathlon plan. I needed a goal, and training for a triathlon sounded like a fun.

  • I wish I had written a recap of that first race, because I don’t really remember very much of it.
  • It rained – poured – in the days leading up, but I didn’t even know to be nervous about slick pavement and sharp corners. I was more worried about being cold.
  • In transition I felt lost. I didn’t know what disc wheels or aero helmets were. Why do you need those? I found a friend and was so happy to have someone to talk to.
  • The swim was the least scary part of the day. No near drownings, got a little off-course, but I just swam until I was done.
  • The bike was fine, too. I hit a rogue cone in the road and yelled out an apology to the volunteer. What was I apologizing for? I didn’t put the cone in the road! But I didn’t crash and kept riding.
  • The run a humid mucky muddy swamp. I felt like I was running a 10k through a mud run course. I got passed a lot on the run but the only run that I’ve run harder since was the 12k’s of Christmas. That run effort, or at least how I remember it, was what racing should feel like.
  • I finished in 2:31:29.
  • Then we went to Cactus for brunch. And I was SO sore.
  • A couple of weeks later I started researching Ironman Canada versus Ironman Coeur d’Alene.

It’s sort of strange to think that a year (and change) ago this sport wasn’t part of my life. Running was, and triathlon was an experiment to keep me busy. I started because the training sounded enough like a cross-training boot camp to be fun. I didn’t know from the first moment that it would stick, but by the end of a summer full of mornings in the lake, sweaty red-faced evening runs, and dewy-aired pre-work rides I was most certainly hooked. And a few injuries, one winter, countless days of rain, and many (many, many, many) hours the training is still my favorite part.

Race days are incredible because they’re the culmination of weeks, months, and/or years of effort. I can easily give myself goose bumps just thinking about a race morning or finish line. But can you really measure the amount of effort it takes to get to the water’s edge (start line) in even 17 hours? I want to be able to, but I don’t think I can. It’s so much more than that, especially for those who are racing themselves more than others.

So how will I celebrate my anniversary? I haven’t decided yet. 🙂

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Race Recap: Seattle Rock n Roll Half Marathon

First off, thanks to this girl who made it possible for me to run! I hoped to make her a little more proud with my finishing time, but hopefully my race doesn’t tarnish your race results too much.

It was a last-minute decision to run this race. After Boise things seemed anti-climactic so I wanted something fun to look forward to. At the same time my foot felt really amazing post-Boise – as did my legs – so I was ready physically and mentally to start ramping up the mileage and focusing on running as a sport rather than a filler.

4 weeks before the race my highest mileage week was about 15 miles, if that.

3 weeks before the race was the Boise 26.3.

2 weeks before the race I ran (well) at track, ran an 8 miler, ran a 9 miler, and ran a 4 miler.

1 week before the race my foot started hurting.

Half Marathon // 13.1 mi // 1:41:07

I’m not proud of my time, but the race was good for a few things:

  • Racing is good practice even if you don’t do well. I ate my pre-race meal, I woke up early, I warmed up, I followed the plan. I didn’t get distracted, and the more times I can make race morning feel like any other morning the better.
  • Even with my not great time I had to fight pretty hard through the last few miles. Or maybe starting at mile 5. I’ll never tell! 🙂 But the negotiating with myself began embarrassingly early but instead I kept running and thought about how much shittier I’ll feel at mile 5 of the marathon during Ironman Canada! Inspiring, right? Truly though I focused on small goals and little things and just kept running. I let myself enjoy the scenery and enjoy being out there, and then I fueled my fire to do much better next time.
  • I wish I could say that I smiled through this race, but I can’t. I had a not-great attitude for a lot of it. That doesn’t mean it was a bad experience or that I didn’t have a good time – because it was a great experience and I did have fun! – but I don’t enjoy not doing as well as I would like to. Period. I’ll work as hard as I have to in order to get there, but in this scenario that wasn’t possible, and I resented that for my whole 1:41:07 out on the course. Next time either be ready to not do “well” or don’t race, self!
  • This was the best RnR event I’ve raced. Not that I’ve done a lot of them, but I’ve done Seattle 3x and this was by far the most organized and put together year. Nice work, competitor group.

Luckily my foot is starting to feel better. I’m thinking it was extremely tight calves causing an altered foot strike (and more pressure on the healed fracture) that was causing pain. Two days with a trigger point roller and I’m nearly good as new.

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Return to the Run

Taking time away from the sport weakens your mind and body no matter how you spin it, and no matter how fit you remain – or get during cross training (DUH! Cuz we all love cross training!)– resuming running is hard work.

It’s hard physically for obvious reasons. Even if your injury is healed your muscles aren’t as tough as they were. Neither are your joints, so though they’re fine they scream about the impact while conforming to the fact that YOU.WILL.RUN. Your heart rate will soar to new heights even if the work doesn’t feel that hard. Every muscle, right up to your teeth, will feel tired post run.

Your mind will think that everything is unreasonable. However fast you were 2 months ago? Yeah, impossibly ridiculously fast. When you do eventually try to run at that pace you once were your mind will tell your legs GO-OMFG-BALLS-TO-THE-WALL-FAST-GO-DYING-HURRY-HURRY-FASTER.  You’ll test it by riding a more comfortable (pace) line, which will be discouraging because you probably won’t hold on long enough to build back the confidence you need to do it right.

Every time I get injured I learn something new about the sport of running. This time it’s that fitness is vital, but your mind is what will make or break your return to running. In the running moment the challenge feels 100% physical while you sweat, pant, and burn. But it’s only a physical challenge for a short time. Your body adjusts to that pain once your mind forces it to (gradually, within reason).

Every single time you can just hold on that next run is an improvement. Re-proving and reminding yourself that you have it in you is just as important as keeping your legs strong and heart healthy.  In reality a large amount of focus, some pushing through it, and forcing yourself to ride that line of barely holding on will do it. And you’ll be well on your way back to where you were.

Self, please remember this. That’s all.

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